Rope by W.F. Lantry

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Background photo: J.B. Stran/PDP, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

W.F. Lantry spent many years walking the deserts and climbing the mountains of Southern California. Now he spends time roaming the Eastern Forests from Maryland to Vermont and practicing woodworking near the Anacostia River. His poetry collections are The Terraced Mountain (Little Red Tree 2015), The Structure of Desire (Little Red Tree 2012), winner of a 2013 Nautilus Award in Poetry, and The Language of Birds (2011). He received his PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Houston. Honors include the National Hackney Literary Award in Poetry, CutBank Patricia Goedicke Prize, Crucible Editors’ Prize, Lindberg Foundation International Poetry for Peace Prize (Israel), the Old Red Kimono Paris Lake Poetry Prize and Potomac Review Prize. His work has appeared widely online and in print. He is the editor of Peacock Journal.

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Murmuration by Luther Kirk

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Background photo: Fae/Wikimedia, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

The eleventh of twelve children, Luther was born and raised in the mountains of Southwest Virginia. Military service bore him far from home but opened doors to a career in education as teacher, principal, and professor. Upon his retirement, he decided to write about his people–the Appalachians. He currently resides in Chesterfield, Virginia with his wife of forty years, Katy. Short stories of his have won first place at the Tennessee Mountain Writer’s Conference (2011) and honorable mention at the Appalachian Heritage Literary Festival (2014). They have appeared in Still: The Journal, and his poetry has been published in Anthology of Appalachian Writers: Charles Frazier, Volume IX (2017) and In God’s Hands: Inspiration from Top Regional Writers (2017). He has also published in various literary journals. Flutter Press published two of his poetry chapbooks: Appalachian Woman (2017), and Child of Appalachia (2018). Short articles of his have also appeared in the Roanoke Times.

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Pelage by Hilary King

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Background photo: Israeljam22/Pixabay, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Hilary King is in her 50s and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area of California.

She writes poetry as a way of witnessing, as an aid to memory, and as a way to explore the mystery of human beings and the world around them. Her poems have appeared in Fourth River, Belletrist, PANK, Blue Fifth Review, Cortland Review and other publications.

She is the author of the book of poems, The Maid’s Car. She also writes plays and is the founder of Trailhead Theatre. When not writing, Hilary works at a historic estate and garden. She also parents, gardens and often resets her passwords at great emotional cost.

Her website is hilarykingwriter.com.

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Colonia by the Sea by Eduardo del Rio

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Background photo: Undisclosed/Pxhere, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Eduardo del Rio is a Cuban exile who grew up in San Juan, Puerto Rico and has lived in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas for the past twenty years. This multi-latinoness gives him a unique perspective on the similarities and differences of these three cultures and informs his literary voice. He is a Professor of Literature and Culture at The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley who has published essays in national and international peer-reviewed journals on British, American, and Latino Literature. His poetry has appeared in The Journal of Caribbean Literature, Voices de Luna, and The McKinley Review. He is the General Editor of  The Prentice Hall Anthology of Latino Literature, as well as a Faculty Fellow for  The National Endowment for the Humanities. His latest book is titled, One Island, Many Voices: Conversations with Cuban-American Writers,  published by The University of Arizona Press.

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The Wooden Swing by Cynthia Pitman

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Background photo: Mumstheword5/Pixabay, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Cynthia Pitman, from Orlando, has had poetry published in issue 127 of  Right Hand Pointing. The title of the issue, The White Room, was taken from her poem, and the artwork was designed around it. She has several poems published by Literary Yard in their current issue, and a short story forthcoming in Saw Palm: Florida Literature and Art. She is also a retired high school English teacher. Retirement is so wonderful, she wonders if it shouldn’t have been her first career choice. She taught all levels of English, from remedial to Advanced Placement. She designed the school’s Writing Program, teaching the first poetry and writing classes in the school. She also created a club called Brown Bag Poetry, which convened during lunch. They listened to one another’s poetry while sharing lunches from their “brown bags.” People would drop in – other teachers, staff, administrators – and join in. Everyone was welcome. Cynthia has a wonderful, patient husband, Tom, who is an artist, two perfect children, Rebecca and Eric, and a grandcat, Ginger. Life is good.

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What Passes as Night by Penelope Moffet

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Background photo: Undisclosed/Pixabay, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Penelope Moffet is a Southern California writer who was one of the first residents at Alderworks Alaska in 2016. This poem was written there. In her regular life Penelope sees cats considerably more often than in quick flashes across meadows. Her home is ruled by two extraordinary felines, Emily and Raku. Penelope’s poems have been published in a number of literary magazines, and she is the author of It Isn’t That They Mean to Kill You, a chapbook published by Arroyo Seco Press in 2018. See more Penelope  here and here.
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Chincoteague by W.F. Lantry

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Background photo: Emma Kerr/PDF, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

W.F. Lantry spent many years walking the deserts and climbing the mountains of Southern California. Now he spends time roaming the Eastern Forests from Maryland to Vermont and practicing woodworking near the Anacostia River. His poetry collections are The Terraced Mountain (Little Red Tree 2015), The Structure of Desire (Little Red Tree 2012), winner of a 2013 Nautilus Award in Poetry, and The Language of Birds (2011). He received his PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Houston. Honors include the National Hackney Literary Award in Poetry, CutBank Patricia Goedicke Prize, Crucible Editors’ Prize, Lindberg Foundation International Poetry for Peace Prize (Israel), the Old Red Kimono Paris Lake Poetry Prize and Potomac Review Prize. His work has appeared widely online and in print. He is the editor of Peacock Journal.

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Young James and the Chincoteague horses

Young James with the Chincoteague Horses

 

 

 

 

 

Grief by Dannye Romine Powell

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Background photo: Patrick Cashin/Wikimedia, CC BY 2.0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Dannye Romine Powell writes most of her poems propped on pillows in her bed, balancing her laptop on her lap. She does this because she is left-handed and very messy and cannot, to save her life, keep a neat desk. Her fourth collection, from Press 53, is Nobody Calls Me Darling Anymore. She spent a winter at Yaddo several years ago and enjoyed living in Sylvia Plath’s former bedroom. She’s won fellowships in poetry from the NEA and the NC Arts Council. She has spent most of her career as a journalist. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner (as well as places no one has ever heard of) and now to the P list, she’s happy to add Postcard Poems and Prose.  
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Hollow Point by Carol Lynne Knight

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Background photo: Cristie Guevara/PDP, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

As co-director of Anhinga Press, Carol Lynne Knight has edited and designed more than 150 literary publications, including books by Naomi Shihab Nye, Diane Wakoski, and the late Judith Kitchen.

Her book of poems, Quantum Entanglement (Apalachee Press) was released in 2010. Her poetry has appeared in Another Chicago Magazine, Louisiana Literature, Tar River Review, Poetry Motel, Earth’s Daughters, The Ledge, Slipstream, Broome Review, Comstock Review, Epicenter, Redactions, Iconoclast, Epicenter, HazMat, So to Speak , and J, and in the anthologies Off the Cuffs (Soft Skull Press), Touched by Eros (Live Poets Society), The Poets Guide to the Birds (Anhinga Press), Beloved on the Earth, (Holy Cow! Press), and North of Wakulla (Anhinga Press). She is a fellow of the Hambidge Center for the Arts and the Bowers House. She is the co-editor of Snakebird: Thirty Years of Anhinga Poets.

Born in Traverse City, Michigan, she grew up in South Florida and graduated from the University of Miami and Florida State University. She has exhibited her drawings, pottery, sculpture and digital images throughout the eastern United States. She is the ex-wife of an ex-police officer and in other lives has worked as a potter, videographer, and graphic designer. She lives in Tallahassee, Florida.

Film & Poetry Workshop with Diane Wakoski and Carol Lynne Knight

Film & Poetry Workshop with Diane Wakoski and Carol Lynne Knight

Carol Lynne Knight with Kelle Groom at AWP 2018

Carol Lynne Knight with Kelle Groom at AWP

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Carol Lynne Knight

Let Slip the Sounds by Kristin Roedell

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Background photo: Undisclosed/Max Pixel, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Kristin Roedell is a Northwest poet and retired attorney. Her work has appeared in over sixty journals and anthologies, including The Journal of the American Medical Association, Switched on Gutenberg, CHEST, and Crab Creek Review. She’s the author of Girls with Gardenias, (Flutter Press.) and Downriver (Aldrich Press).  She was the 2013 winner of NISA’s 11th Annual Brainstorm Poetry Contest and a finalist in the 2013 Crab Creek Review poetry contest; Down River was a finalist for the 2015 Quercus Review Press poetry prize.

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Pastina Stelline by Christopher Stolle

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Background photo: Geralt/Pixabay, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Christopher Stolle’s writing has appeared most recently in Tipton Poetry Journal, Flying Island, Edify Fiction, Contour, The New Southern Fugitives, The Gambler, Gravel, The Light Ekphrastic, Sheepshead Review, and Plath Poetry Project. He works as an acquisitions and development editor for Penguin Random House, and he lives in Richmond, Indiana.

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The New Witches by Jessica Hickey

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Background image: Jessica Hickey
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Hailing from Silicon Valley in northern California, Jessica recently moved to her husband’s hometown in Michigan and now spends her days navigating a befuddling maze of snow gear, ground bologna, and gun racks in the rural Midwest. She has a habit of collecting hobbies no one is interested in sharing, such as raising silkworms, going to the opera, and learning French.

Jessica is an avid participant in everything nostalgic. She has dozens of penpals (with real stamps!), listens to her favorite music on vinyl and vintage speakers, and refuses to give up on the impossible 1940s hairstyles she finds on Pinterest.

She has published a short story in The Corvus Review, a poem in The Bitchin’ Kitsch, and artwork in The New England Review and Floyd County Moonshine. Her greatest motivator is the fact that her 12-year-old daughter has published more poems than she has.

Jessica once pretended to be a blogger and posted some humorous essays at www.landofsilkandhoney.com.

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The Lake/House by Todd Mercer

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Background photo: Carl Penergy/Flickr, CC BY 2.0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Todd Mercer is an independent writer in Grand Rapids, Michigan who was nominated for Best of the Net in 2018. Mercer won the Woodstock Writers Festival’s Flash Fiction contest, 1st, 2nd and 3rd place of the Kent County Dyer-Ives Poetry Prizes and the Grand Rapids Festival Flash Fiction Prize. He judged the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Awards and Independent Publisher’s Poetry Book of the Year contest several years. His chapbook Box of Echoes won the Michigan Writers Cooperative Press contest. His digital chapbook, Life-wish Maintenance, can be read free at Right Hand Pointing, Recent poetry & fiction appear in: Defenestration, Dime Show Review, Eunoia Review, 50-Word Stories, 100 Word Story The Lake, Leaves of Ink, Literary Orphans, The Pangolin Review, Plum Tree Tavern, Praxis, Riggwelter, Scarlet Leaf Review, Soft Cartel and Zero Flash.

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Todd Mercer with sisters Megan and Laura

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Todd Mercer at Creston Brewery

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Star the Dog Kelley-Mercer in her wedding tutu before her folks got married

Farewell from New Zealand by Karen Pierce Gonzalez

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Background photo: Undisclosed/Max Pixel, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Karen Pierce Gonzalez’s fiction and non-fiction work has appeared in The San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Magazine, Big Blend Magazine, Zahir: Unforgettable TalesVEGA, Postcard Poems and Prose, and other literary magazines and newspapers.

A former features journalist and author of Family Folktales: What Are Yours, and Family Folktales: Write Your Own Family Storiesshe has facilitated many folklore and fiction writing workshops in the San Francisco Bay Area and has earned several national and regional literary awards.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts degrees in Creative Writing and Anthropological Linguistics/Folklore from Sonoma State University, and is publisher of FolkHeart Press, a boutique Northern California press that celebrates folklore. Her own folklore research includes “Sonoma County Scarecrows: Scarecrows as Folk Art”. She creates food tales (food lore) you can eat and is founder/coordinator of the annual spine-tingling Mystery Writers in the Mausoleum.

When not writing or exploring the world of folklore or helping select clients with their public relations needs, she creates multi-media fiber and/or wood (bark) art and recently learned from skilled British Columbia and Alaskan First Nations’ artists how to tan Salmon skin into leather she hopes to include in her next art project.

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The Invention of Crime Scene Tape by Hilary King

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Background photo: Sofia PD/Wikimedia, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Hilary King is in her 50s and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. She writes poetry as a way of witnessing, as an aid to memory, and as a way to explore the mystery of human beings and the world around them. Her poems have appeared in Fourth River, Belletrist, PANK, Blue Fifth Review, Cortland Review and other publications. She is the author of the book of poems, The Maid’s Car. She also writes plays and is the founder of Trailhead Theatre. When not writing, Hilary works at a historic estate and garden. She also parents, gardens and often resets her passwords at great emotional cost. Her website is here.

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And Everything in Its Place by Sally Zakariya

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Background photo: KillerChihuahua/Wikimedia, CC BY 3.0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Sally Zakariya has been writing all her life—articles, fiction, poetry, random notes and lists. She lives with her husband and two cats in Northern Virginia, where she studies poetry and Spanish and writes at an antique desk looking out at telephone wires and maple trees. Her Pushcart Prize-nominated poetry has appeared in some 70 print and online journals and won prizes from the Poetry Society of Virginia and the Virginia Writers Club. Zakariya is the author, most recently, of Personal Astronomy (Finishing Line Press) and When You Escape (Five Oaks Press) and the editor of a poetry anthology, Joys of the Table. A former magazine writer and editor, Zakariya has also designed and self-published illustrated alphabet books on anatomy, food, literature, and other topics. She blogs here.

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Sally Zakariya 2018

 

My Mother’s Garden by Moonlight by Kristin Roedell

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Background photo: C.K. Koay/Flickr, CC BY-NC 2.0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Kristin Roedell is a Northwest poet and retired attorney. Her work has appeared in over sixty journals and anthologies, including The Journal of the American Medical Association, Switched on Gutenberg, CHEST, and Crab Creek Review. She’s the author of Girls with Gardenias, (Flutter Press.) and Downriver (Aldrich Press).  She was the 2013 winner of NISA’s 11th Annual Brainstorm Poetry Contest and a finalist in the 2013 Crab Creek Review poetry contest; Down River was a finalist for the 2015 Quercus Review Press poetry prize.

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Serpentine by Carol Lynne Knight

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Background photo: Undisclosed/Pixnio, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

As co-director of Anhinga Press, Carol Lynne Knight has edited and designed more than 150 literary publications, including books by Naomi Shihab Nye, Diane Wakoski, and the late Judith Kitchen.

Her book of poems, Quantum Entanglement (Apalachee Press) was released in 2010. Her poetry has appeared in Another Chicago Magazine, Louisiana Literature, Tar River Review, Poetry Motel, Earth’s Daughters, The Ledge, Slipstream, Broome Review, Comstock Review, Epicenter, Redactions, Iconoclast, Epicenter, HazMat, So to Speak , and J, and in the anthologies Off the Cuffs (Soft Skull Press), Touched by Eros (Live Poets Society), The Poets Guide to the Birds (Anhinga Press), Beloved on the Earth, (Holy Cow! Press), and North of Wakulla (Anhinga Press). She is a fellow of the Hambidge Center for the Arts and the Bowers House. She is the co-editor of Snakebird: Thirty Years of Anhinga Poets.

Born in Traverse City, Michigan, she grew up in South Florida and graduated from the University of Miami and Florida State University. She has exhibited her drawings, pottery, sculpture and digital images throughout the eastern United States. She is the ex-wife of an ex-police officer and in other lives has worked as a potter, videographer, and graphic designer. She lives in Tallahassee, Florida.

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Film & Poetry Workshop with Diane Wakoski and Carol Lynne Knight

Carol Lynne Knight with Kelle Groom at AWP 2018

Carol Lynne Knight with Kelle Groom at AWP

Knight, Carol Lynne

Carol Lynne Knight

Lake Ticanu by Penelope Moffet

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Background photo: Penelope Moffet
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

Born in Lorain, Ohio, Penelope Moffet was transplanted to Southern California by her parents when she was not quite 3. As a child, she became The Fastest Finger in the West, teaching herself to rapidly type up stories and poems with just one finger, a skill that did her little good in her future work as bakery girl, fast food cashier, draperies manager, paste-up artist, publicist, freelance writer, photographer, editor and legal secretary.

Her poetry has been published in Natural Bridge, Permafrost, Levure Litteraire, Truthdig, Pearl, Steam Ticket, Wavelength, The Sow’s Ear Poetry Review and other literary journals. Her poems have also been included in What Wildness is This: Women Write about the Southwest (University of Texas Press, 2007) and Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes and Shifts of Los Angeles (Tia Chucha Press, 2016). She has been awarded artist residencies by Dorland Mountain Arts Colony, The Mesa Refuge, The Helen R. Whiteley Center and Alderworks Alaska. She has published two chapbooks, Keeping Still (Dorland Mountain Arts Colony, 1995) and It Isn’t That They Mean to Kill You (Arroyo Seco Press, 2018).

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Verse-Virtual: An Online Community Journal of Poetry

Rise Up Review

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Mango Tree by James Penha

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Background photo: Sarangib/Pixabay, CC0.
Manipulation and design layout: Elizabeth Stark

A native New Yorker, James Penha has lived for the past quarter-century in Indonesia. Nominated for Pushcart Prizes in fiction and poetry, his stories appear in the many journals and anthologies, including the 2018 Lambda Literary Award winning anthology His Seed. His dystopian poem “2020” is part of the 2017 Not My President collection. His essay “It’s Been a Long Time Coming” was featured in The New York Times “Modern Love” column in April 2016. Penha edits TheNewVerse.News, an online journal of current-events poetry.

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