A Postcard From Where I Live Now by Lennart Lundh

Art Credit = Lennart Lundh

Art Credit ~ Lennart Lundh

Lennart Lundh has been published as a poet, short-fiction writer, photographer, and military historian since 1965. Along the way, his work has earned Pushcart and Best of the Net nominations. He’s also been a janitor, cardboard box maker, mainframe computer systems consultant, and text acquisitions manager. Len and Lin, his wife of forty-six years, have three daughters, six grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter. The space in their northern Illinois home that was once filled by the daughters is now given over to dogs, cats, and an awful lot of books, music, movies, and art.

To find his books of aviation history, search his name at the Web pages of Schiffer Publishing (www.schifferbooks.com) and Squadron/Signal Publications (www.squadronsignalpublications.com), or at http://www.bookfinder.com.

Examples of his fiction can be found in the archives of the original Liars League (www.liarsleague.com); Arachne Press’ 2013 Weird Lies anthology (www.arachnepress.com); Jet Fuel Review (www.jetfuelreview.com), and the premier issue of CoffeeShop Blues (www.amazon.com).

Online, his poetry can be found in venues as diverse as Poetry Storehouse (http://poetrystorehouse.com/), The Lake (http://www.thelakepoetry.co.uk/), and earlier appearances in Postcard Poems and Prose. In print, both poetry and photography can be found in several of the Squire anthologies produced by Writing Knights Press (www.store.writingknights.com). WKP is also the publisher of three of Len’s chapbooks: Four Poems (2012), Pictures of an Other Day (2013), and So Careless of Themselves (2014). A fourth chapbook, Poems Against Cancer 2014, was written for the benefit of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, which funds research into, and treatment of, childhood cancers; as a limited-run, hand-bound edition for donors, there are only fourteen copies extant.

Len is a fairly regular reader at Chicago-area open mics, and a less-frequent feature at Cleveland bookstore basement events. There are readings of several poems, and the full text of an interview done for Arachne Press, on YouTube. And, if that’s not enough, there are dozens of other print and online venues that have included his work over a period of forty-nine years. Perhaps Len’s favorite among the print journals his work has appeared in is The Binnacle, published by the University of Maine at Machias, which has the sensibility, look, and feel of issues of Poetry Magazine from back in the Seventies.

The following are spontaneous answers to what has become known as “James Lipton’s Questionnaire.” A review of the list and its history can be found at http://senselist.com/2006/09/06/the-questionnaires-of-james-lipton-bernard-pivot-and-marcel-proust/.

Want is your favorite word?

Peace.

What is your least favorite word?

Anger.

What turns you on creatively, spiritually or emotionally?

Everything.

What turns you off?

Not having enough hours in the day.

What is your favorite curse word?

(bleep)

What sound or noise do you love?

Just one? Laughter.

What sound or noise do you hate?

Explosions.

What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?

Acting.

What profession would you not like to do?

Law enforcement.

If Heaven exists, what would you like to hear God say when you arrive at the Pearly Gates?

You done good, kid. Now go back and try to do better.

The author reads at the June, 2014 edition of the monthly Lit by the Bridge event, held at Culture Stock in Aurora, Illinois. Photo by Kristin LaTour.

The author reads at the June, 2014 edition of the monthly Lit by the Bridge event, held at Culture Stock in Aurora, Illinois. Photo by Kristin LaTour.

A decidedly pedestrian view of the barn which complements the text above. It took much thought to find a view that elevated this average building above itself.

A decidedly pedestrian view of the barn which complements the text above. It took much thought to find a view that elevated this average building above itself.

If interest in literature is almost extinct, as some would have us believe, the surviving words from my story would be gathering by moonlight in a barn such as this, plotting their return to power over every imaginable universe.

If interest in literature is almost extinct, as some would have us believe, the surviving words from my story would be gathering by moonlight in a barn such as this, plotting their return to power over every imaginable universe.

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